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20 Simple Wrinkle Erasers

Updated: Apr 18

1. Stop smoking (It’s #1 for a reason)


2. Always wear sunscreen whether it’s cloudy or sunny and don’t sun-bake.

3. Hydrate your skin by drinking about 8 glasses of water a day.


4. Use skincare products that contain antioxidants and AHA's.


5. Moisturize the skin on your face twice daily


6. Reduce stress. (Try reading, exercising, meditating) 15 minutes a day is a good start.


7. Reduce alcohol consumption. Overindulging can put enormous strain on your system and will accelerate wrinkles forming.


8. Eat healthily by incorporating plenty of quality food

in your daily diet.


9. Sleep at least 8 hours every night.

10. Eat fish three times a week. Great for the skin and general health.


11. Check with your doctor about taking supplements, your diet may be lacking some of the important ones.


12. Use an eye cream for the delicate skin around the eyes nightly.


13. Facial scrubs remove the build-up of dead cells that can increase the appearance of wrinkles, try this weekly.


14. Use natural skincare products that will nourish your skin and give it lots of vitamins and minerals to help it stay fresh and healthy.


15. Jojoba oil resembles the skin’s natural oils. Dab this around the eyes to keep wrinkles at bay.


16. Take vitamin C food, supplements, and use products that contain vitamin C, it will help boost your collagen.


17. Start a good skincare routine in your 20’s. Prevention is easier than a cure.


18. Honey is known worldwide for its beneficial abilities. Use a honey mask weekly. Simply apply the honey to your face and neck and leave for 30 minutes then rinse off. This mask will "feed" your skin with nutrients.


19. Aloe Vera and Avocado oil both have the ability to prevent the skin from drying out; they are both used to improve the skin’s elasticity.


20. A soothing way to help achieve a wrinkle-free face is to lie on your back with your knees elevated by placing a pillow or cushion beneath them




References:



Burlando B, Cornara L. Honey in dermatology and skin care: a review. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2013 Dec;12(4):306-13. doi: 10.1111/jocd.12058. PMID: 24305429.


Cao, Changwei et al. “Diet and Skin Aging-From the Perspective of Food Nutrition.” Nutrients vol. 12,3 870. 24 Mar. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12030870


Carnwath R, Graham EM, Reynolds K, Pollock PJ. The antimicrobial activity of honey against common equine wound bacterial isolates. Vet J. 2014 Jan;199(1):110-4. doi: 10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.07.003. Epub 2013 Aug 17. PMID: 23962613

Chycki, Jakub et al. “The effect of mineral-based alkaline water on hydration status and the metabolic response to short-term anaerobic exercise.” Biology of sport vol. 34,3 (2017): 255-261. doi:10.5114/biolsport.2017.66003


Ganceviciene, Ruta et al. “Skin anti-aging strategies.” Dermato-endocrinology vol. 4,3 (2012): 308-19. doi:10.4161/derm.22804


Lin, Tzu-Kai et al. “Anti-Inflammatory and Skin Barrier Repair Effects of Topical Application of Some Plant Oils.” International journal of molecular sciences vol. 19,1 70. 27 Dec. 2017, doi:10.3390/ijms19010070


Liska, DeAnn et al. “Narrative Review of Hydration and Selected Health Outcomes in the General Population.” Nutrients vol. 11,1 70. 1 Jan. 2019, doi:10.3390/nu11010070


Popkin, Barry M et al. “Water, hydration, and health.” Nutrition reviews vol. 68,8 (2010): 439-58. doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2010.00304.x


Rodan, Katie et al. “Skincare Bootcamp: The Evolving Role of Skincare.” Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open vol. 4,12 Suppl Anatomy and Safety in Cosmetic Medicine: Cosmetic Bootcamp e1152. 14 Dec. 2016, doi:10.1097/GOX.0000000000001152


Schagen, Silke K et al. “Discovering the link between nutrition and skin aging.” Dermato-endocrinology vol. 4,3 (2012): 298-307. doi:10.4161/derm.22876


Surjushe, Amar et al. “Aloe vera: a short review.” Indian journal of dermatology vol. 53,4 (2008): 163-6. doi:10.4103/0019-5154.44785

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